Archive for the ‘Music I Am’ Category

Music I Am #9 – Kathleen Supové

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

It wasn’t until sophomore year of college. Otherwise, I had thought it would be a lifelong avocation!

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Diplomacy!

Two ways you stay motivated:

Pressure of public events, and the joy they bring! The prospect of discovering a wonderful new piece!

Latest album or recording project:

Latest solo album already released: Eye to Ivory on Starkland. Latest collection Lockdown And Loss, music of Neil Rolnick, on Other Minds Records. Upcoming: Migration project recording, big solo project.

4a.     What inspired it:

It started with my interest in an event in Portland, Oregon, the yearly migration of Vaux’s Swifts, where they think a chimney is an overnight roost. This has become a spectator sport there. But it lead to an interest in migration of animals, peoples, and even plants! It’s hard to read the news today and not be inspired by the migration of fellow humans.

4b.     Who’s on it:

The recordings I mention are of solo projects. I’ve been fortunate to record with the following people in the past year: Neil Rolnick, Tessa Brinckman, Guy Barash, Nick Flynn (poet, reading his work), Frank London, and Ayal Maoz, Gilbert Galindo, Iktus, and the Argus Quartet.

How do you discover new music?

Going to concerts when I can, which isn’t often enough. Word of mouth is extremely powerful, at least towards getting me to check something out. Sometimes, I will listen in an exploratory way at home, I wish that worked better. I’m usually much more clear in evaluating something when I hear it go out live to a room of people.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Ahhh, so tough to narrow it down: Living: Urmas Sisask Deceased: Horatiu Radulescu

Where can we find you online?

Website 
Youtube
Facebook
FB page
Instagram

Next Concert: 

Feb. 4 at the Longy School of Music

Music I Am #8 – Cellista

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

I was ten. A string quartet performed late Beethovens at my elementary school. I was sitting on the floor by the cellist, who was well over 6’3″ and sported an afro and eye patch. He was the coolest person I’d ever encountered. As he played, I could feel the cello’s vibrations and that was that. I fell in love with cello. It was decided, I’d be a cellist.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Time management and writing skills.

Two ways you stay motivated:

Well, truthfully, my general feeling of inadequacy makes me work hard, and the feeling (since COVID) that everything could be taken away in an instant. Sorry if that was a bit a downer.

Latest album or recording project:

PARIAH – an operetta composed for immersive audio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4a.     What inspired it:

It draws on the narrative threads of previous projects, all of which have something to do with themes of exile, otherness, and serenity.

4b.     Who’s on it:

hahaha! More than thirty collaborators including the rapper DEM ONE, the soprano Carla Canales. Composer Daniel Felsenfeld, wrote the preface to the accompanying book I wrote with my father, the philosopher Frank Seeburger.

How do you discover new music?

Most of the time, it’s from playing or performing in a wide variety of strange shows where you wouldn’t usually find a cellist. I love the noise community, buskers on the streets of the Bay area, burlesque shows, circus act, the list goes on.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

I refuse to give more attention to dead composers. And ALL living composers deserve more attention and programming, especially composers coming from marginalized communities.

Where can we find you online?

cellista.net | Twitter/IG: @xcellistax | Fb.com/cellista.music

 

Photo: JD Lenzen, 2022

Music I Am #7 – Peter Yates

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

Tomorrow morning – as I sit down [or stand] to practice.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

The sense, or rather the ‘conceit’, that there are things that ‘need’ doing, that the world needs to hear, that you’ve been waiting for and are getting tired of not encountering. So, you do it yourself. It helps if it seems risky – as in not what you’re ‘supposed’ to be doing.

Two ways you stay motivated:

First is an awareness that the ‘glow’ we seek in music is, while elusive, always closer by a single step. Blend is an example – minute adjustments in voicing of parts or layers reliably pay huge dividends in ‘matteringness’. It’s like free money, every time. Second is the conceit mentioned above – the need to do the undone.

Latest album or recording project:

My ‘sell-out’ holiday album, The 12-Tones of Christmas, currently being engraved, and soon to be recorded.

4a.     What inspired it:

Aaron Larget-Caplan’s ‘New Lullaby Project’.

4b.     Who’s on it:

Me. It is my rare foray into truly solo guitar composition and performance. For more typical, collaborative projects, see ‘PopArt Songs vol. 1 [calguitar.com], or my many posts at youtube/peterfyates

How do you discover new music?

By thinking, composing, and performing.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Dead: Juan Vasquez [16th-century] Songs derived from his madrigals, as intabulated for vihuela by Miguel de Fuenllana.

Living: Peter Yates. I don’t need more attention, though my stuff rewards attention. I know this mainly from collaborating on it with other musicians. Also, in the days of cars with CD players, I’d give discs to musicians to play on their drives from LA to San Francisco. With [again, in those days] not much else to do, they’d get the message. A third example is a guy who had a crush on my singer, so he followed my stuff closely, got hooked.

Where can we find you online?

Calguitar.com – California Guitar Archives

Youtube/peterfyates 

Email: pyates@ucla.edu

Peter F. Yates – woodcut with yucca

Peter F. Yates Mask

Music I Am #6 – Laura Strickling

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

When I sang my first solo in the church Christmas pageant at the age of 5

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Organization, Administration, Networking (Basically, business skills)

Two ways you stay motivated:

(1) Dreaming up new projects and devising ways to accomplish them (2) Knowing that I am working hard and doing my job to the best of my ability – putting in the hours to make that a reality.

Latest album or recording project:

The 40@40 Project – Coming on the Bright Shiny Things label in Feb (?) 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

4a.     What inspired it:

A desire to be a part of making the future of art song bright by commissioning new works.

4b.     Who’s on it:

Myself and pianist Daniel Schlosberg, performing songs by 20 Composers

How do you discover new music?

Social Media. Attending my colleague’s concerts.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Juhi Bansal (living) and…I dunno! 🙂

Where can we find you online?

www.laurastrickling.com
Spotify

Photo by Alexandra Querrard

Photo by Alexandra Querrard

Music I am #5 – Johnathan McCullough

1.    The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:
 
Los Angeles Opera and Opera Pacific Opera camps are what affirmed my decision to go into the arts in college. Performing Oppenheimer in Doctor Atomic is what confirmed it for me that this was the career I wanted to go after. 
 
2.     An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

I think organizational skills and good communication are essential. 

3.     Two ways you stay motivated:
 
Determination to outdo myself and conceiving new projects
 
4.     Latest album or recording project:
 
Soldier Songs by David T. Little
 
 

4a.     What inspired it:
 
Mental Health in the veteran community
 
4b.     Who’s on it:
 
Myself, Corrado Rovaris, Philadelphia Opera Orchestra members, Elizabeth Braden, and Grant Loehnig
 
5.     How do you discover new music?
 
Talking to people like you!
 
6.     One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:
 
Brian Petuch! His opera Portrait and Dream is stunning! 
 
7.     Where can we find you online?
 
 
 

Doctor Atomic at Curtis (Photo by Karlie Cadel)

Soldier Songs (photo by Phil Bradshaw)

 

Music I Am #4 – Elena Ruehr

 
1.    The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:
 
When I was a senior in high school and realized there was nothing else I wanted to do.
 
2.     An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:
 
Being an efficient and savvy business person.
 
3.     Two ways you stay motivated:
 
I’m inspired by the musician/performers I work with and also by my students at MIT.
 
4.     Latest album or recording project:
 
Icarus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4a.     What inspired it:
 
The performers and the stories I wanted to tell–it’s all program music. The first piece on the recording, A Thousand Cranes, is the story of children of war, inspired by the experiences the Delgani’s violist Kimberlee Uwate told me about her grandparents during WWII. The second piece was inspired by the story of Icarus, but told from the point of view of relationship of father and son working together. The Worlds Revolve, third on the CD, is inspired by poetry of T.S. Eliot. Lastly is Insect Dances which was written as a work for listeners of all ages, and is now an animated film for kids and adults.
 
4b.     Who’s on it:
 
Borromeo, Delgani and Arneis Quartets with Donald Berman and Jon Manassee
 
5.     How do you discover new music?
 
By listening to my friends and colleagues music.
 
6.     One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:
 
Living is composer Reena Esmail: I think she is the next most cool up and coming young composer. Dead musician is my old teacher Vincent Persichetti, whose music is lovely and not performed as much as it should be.
 
7.     Where can we find you online?
 

Elena Ruehr, Composer

 

Music I Am #3 – Tom Nazziola

1.    The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:
 
9 years old or so
 
2.     An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:
 
Communicate with others
 
3.     Two ways you stay motivated:
 
Exercise regularly and imagine new projects
 
4.     Latest album or recording project:
 
Immovable Do
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4a.     What inspired it:
 
Bach preludes and the minimalist aesthetic
 
4b.     Who’s on it:
 
Wade Culbreath and myself
 
5.     How do you discover new music?
 
I listen to recommendations by my peers.
 
6.     One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:
 
Living: I really don’t have an answer for this one.
Dead: Lennie Tristano
 
7.     Where can we find you online?
 
 

Tom Nazziola, Composer

* Tom wrote ‘Lull-a-by-the-sea’ for Aaron’s New Lullaby Project.

Music I Am #2 – Gene Caprioglio

 
Aaron:    The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:
 
Gene: I was playing a duet with my guitar teacher, and suddenly, it all fit perfectly together. This triggered a great feeling of exhilaration. Ah, so this is what it’s all about.
 
Aaron:    An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:
 
Gene: What are commonly defined as people skills. You can be a great musician, but you also need to be able to relate to and feel comfortable with all kinds of people. This applies to relating to the audience from the stage, but also in the offices of bookers with others musician and just about everybody.
 
Aaron:   Two ways you stay motivated:
 
Gene: I like to continually have new ideas brewing and projects in the works. Do not get into the rut of doing the same material the same way all the time. Always think about growing and the next idea. It also helps to remember that you only have so much time on this planet, so don’t waste any time. It becomes more urgent as you age, but hey, you never know when you are going to go, so get all that stuff done that you want to do.
 
Aaron: Latest album or recording project:
 
Gene: My most recent project was a song/video I did called Space Dust.
 
Aaron:    What inspired it:
 
Gene: I had been reading about how microscopic particles are continually finding their way to earth. They are called cosmic dust or space dust. I had some thoughts about it, and a song was born. You can see it here:
 
 
Aaron:    Who’s on it:
 
Gene: My wife, Paule Diamond and I, did all the music. I did the video.
 
Aaron:    How do you discover new music?
 
Gene: I still listen to the radio. I go out to hear music as often as possible. Streaming has made it so easy to hear new music too. I even listen to the Spotify Weekly Discovery playlist.
 
Aaron:   One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:
 
Gene: I’d have to go with Sister Rosetta Tharpe for my dead musician. She has been getting a bit more recognition, but not nearly as much as she deserves. There are so many living musicians that could use more attention, but I’ll stick with the gals and go with Mary Halvorson. Not a complete unknown, but not a household name either.
 
Aaron:    Where can we find you online?
 
Facebook: Gene Caprioglio
Facebook: The Bumper Crop Boys – Gene’s main Band
Spotify: The Bumper Crop Boys
 

Gene Caprioglio

The Bumper Crop Boys

Music I Am #1 – Ruth Hertz Weber

1.    The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

From the time I was 4 my mom would sit me on the piano bench with her and we would play and sing songs together. It made me so happy and I knew that I wanted to do that for the rest of my life.

2.     An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

I think the most important skill you can cultivate is maintaining positivity! People you meet, collaborate with, and perform for are going to feel this from you and it is contagious! Once you get in the habit of maintaining a positive attitude it starts becoming automatic.

3.     Two ways you stay motivated:

I like listening to all types of music, and many times I listen to a genre that I am not familiar with so I can get new ideas and try and use those musical ideas in my own style of music. Hearing all these new types of music gets me interested in creating!

4.     Latest album or recording project:

My daughter and I released a new single a few months ago called The Music to My Life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4a.     What inspired it?

I was inspired to write a song with a new collaborator, Mike Greenly, when he mentioned to me how devastated he was at the passing of his husband, a very famous D.J during the disco era. He called him, “The Music to his words.” I suggested we write a song about that and dedicate it to his memory. We ended up writing, “The Music to My Life,” and dedicating it to anyone who has lost a soulmate or someone they loved very deeply.

4b.     Who’s on it?

I did the arranging on this single and my daughter, Emilia Lopez-Yañez was the featured vocalist on the song.

5.     How do you discover new music?

I discover new music in many different ways. I find classical music that I enjoy by attending concerts and listening to recommendations of musician friends, and I find other types of music I like by searching streaming sites like Spotify or youtube.

6.     One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

I am very inspired by the singer/songwriter Jeff Blumenkrantz. He is an actor and singer/songwriter. His songs have such insight and depth in their lyrics and have amazing harmonies underneath them that illustrate the text really well. As far as a dead musician that I think deserves more attention I would have to say my late songwriting teacher Jack Segal. Jack wrote many songs which became hits back in the day, and also that appeared in movies like Star Trek, but they have kind of disappeared now. He had a group of young songwriters that he taught and mentored, and that I was fortunate to be a part of. Many of those writers are very successful now and carry on his legacy. His songs are still very relevant today and are very worth checking out!

 

7.     Where can we find you online?

Website

Kids music website

Spotify

Ruth Hertz Weber