Archive for the ‘Music I Am’ Category

Music I Am #49 , Amy Brandon, composer

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

Not sure. I think working with sound was what I always wanted but wasn’t sure how to go about it. I was always interested in sound, in particular I would stay underwater for long periods of time when swimming as a kid because of how it sounded.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Being a good colleague.

Two ways you stay motivated:

Capturing what I hear internally and transporting it externally is always an interesting challenge, and what primarily motivates me. Financially maintaining myself in the arts is also a challenge and has it’s own interesting aspects.

Latest Project :

I recently was nominated for a JUNO award (Canadian Grammy equivalent) for my cello concerto, Simulacra*. This piece will be released with an album of chamber works called Lysis – (including my 10-string guitar piece Intermountainous) – on August 16, 2024 on New Focus Recordings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

Simulacra is essentially a sonification of my own personal struggles with human identity. Like many others, I’ve often felt intense pressure to alter aspects of my fundamental self in order to do basic things like work and interact with others. I express this in the piece by making the timbre of the cello a metaphor for this kind of self- inhibition – it travels from one timbral extreme to another from the narrowest of timbral ranges to the fullest.

Who’s on it:

The brilliant cellist Jeffrey Zeigler is the soloist, I wrote the piece for him. Karl Hirzer is the conductor and Symphony Nova Scotia the orchestra. The piece was performed at the Open Waters Festival in 2023.

How do you discover new music?

Usually through research for particular pieces I am writing. I don’t listen to music for pleasure or relaxation, usually.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Living – composer Pascale Criton

Dead – jazz guitarist Emily Remler

Where can we find you online?

amybrandon.caInstagram

SpotifyBandcamp

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

My string quartet Lysis will be performed at the ISCM Festival in the Faroe Islands in June.

JeffZeigler and SymphonyNovaScotia

Cellist Jeff Zeigler, Amy, conductor Karl Hirzer

Music, Open Studios: Music Curated by Pedja Muzijevic, Concert in the 21st Century

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Simulacra credit to artist is Susan Roston, Nub 2, Photographer is Andrew Rashotte.

Music I Am #48 – Jason Doell, composer & sound artist

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

ooooof…dunno. but it began to feel like a thing when some friends and I formed a band in high school to play songs I was writing.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

so many these days – we all have to wear so many hats! Project management, communications, financial planning…

Two ways you stay motivated:

i don’t have any system in place or have any external motivators….music is just so much part of my everyday….and my mind is always just racing

Latest Project:

becoming in shadows ~ of being touched – released in April on Whited Sepulchre records. 

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

Daily practice actually heheehehe I was at the Banff Centre and my morning warm up was piano improvisations. That became the heart of this really weird work.

Who’s on it:

Myself, Mauro Zannoli, and the algorithm I created sad(john).low

How do you discover new music?

I listen to podcasts and radio shows, I get lost in app recommendations and follow genre histories, I go to live shows frequently, I have lots of friends with whom I share listening suggestions…

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Dead: Noah Creshevsky

Living: Xuan Ye

Where can we find you online?

https://www.jasondoell.com/

Upcoming Event you’d like to share? (optional)

just had a baby…so nothing until June in Sweden!

Music I Am #47 – Marti Epstein- composer, pianist, absent-minded professor

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

More precisely, the moment I knew I that I AM a musician (whether I want to be or not) was when I was 4 and figured out how to play Hava Nagila on the piano. The moment I knew I was a composer was when my band director in high school, Dr. Steven Lawrence had me arrange something for the marching band. As soon as I heard what I had written played by the performers, I was hooked.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Being kind and respectful to performers and colleagues.

Two ways you stay motivated:

I live in terror of missing a deadline. And, I live to create music.

Latest Project:

I am writing a motet for Emmanuel Music, and then I will be writing a piece for the Kozar/Byrne Duo.

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

The motet is inspired by the Bach Cantata it is being paired with (Cantata 94) as well as the sentiment expressed by Psalm 133 (“Hine Ma Tov Umanayim”- how good it is for all to live together under one tent).

Who’s on it:

The singers of Emmanuel Music.

How do you discover new music?

Scorefollower, music reviews, things my students tell me about, things my kid tell me about.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

  • Dead Musician: Toru Takemitsu. His orchestral music should be on every major orchestra’s programming list and it isn’t.
  • Living Musician: Bryn Harrison. Brilliant, brilliant English composer.

Where can we find you online?

martiepstein.com; soundcloud; Facebook; Instagram; bandcamp

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

Emmanuel premiere is February 25th, but I also have a premiere of a piece I wrote for 8 cellos coming up this spring. Not sure of that date yet!

M. Epstein photos by ©️2023 Michael D Spencer

Music I Am #46 – Aliana de la Guardia, a holistic life and career consultant for creatives, a non-profit arts leader, a theater artist, a producer, a teacher, Jedi, and warrior for artistic misfits

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

When I first started taking voice lessons, it was the only thing I wanted to do. I knew I wanted to sing forever.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Writing and thinking. These two skills are so important to learn. I have always had a really rich journaling practice, and having the skill of reflection through writing has gotten me through some difficult times in my life and helped me expand ideas of who I am in the world, in music, and in the greater arts landscape. 

I certainly helps with grant writing and appeals for fundraising, but beyond that, it’s so important to come up with your own language for your art – what exactly it is that you do, why you do it, and what difference it makes in the world. 

The ability to ask questions and reflect on successes and failures allows you to hone your craft in a different way. I wish it didn’t take me 20 years to learn this, but now that I have these skills (and still improving), I’m a much better executive and artist.

Two ways you stay motivated:

  1. Stay involved with or start projects that are meaningful to me 
  2. Have hobbies that are not related to my professional career.

Latest Project:

My project, Bahué, has launched the second annual Latinx Composer Miniature Challenge (LCMC 2.0), which we envisioned as a sister project to the Castle of our Skins’ Black Composer Miniature Challenge. The Bahué #LCMC 2.0 asks composers who identify as Latin American or part of the Latin Diaspora to compose pieces for me and percussionist Ariel Campos that must be 30 seconds or so. We love for pieces to be inspired by themes of Latinidad, but it’s not required!

Pieces are due February 18, 2023 and early submissions are welcome and encouraged! We will record the works in June 2024 and broadcast the performances on social media and YouTube starting September 2024 (Hispanic Heritage Month). There is no cost to enter and the composers of all chosen works will be compensated.

What inspired it:

I felt alone when I first started searching for representation in concert repertoire and it felt like my interest in connecting to my culture through music was seen as a novelty because it was outside of the traditional repertoire. So this was always an interest and in my mind, but with Bahué and with Ariel, I figured out how to blend this interest with my passion for working with composers and with new music. We all need a space where we are not a novelty. Where we can celebrate new voices in our culture as well as the musical heritage that shapes us.

Who’s on it:

My duo partner, percussionist Ariel Campos, and any composers that want to apply!

How do you discover new music?

Through chorale in my undergrad, actually! I also became friends with a composer who asked me to sing his music more. Soo after, more composers started asking me to sing their music, and beyond that, I started looking for more composers on my own, and the rest is history! 

I still do that to this day. I go through periods where I’m Google Searching through websites and YouTube. Sometimes I’m going through lists to see if composers have specific instrumentation, sometimes I’m just listening to vocal works.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

I don’t know that I can answer this question. I’m not the kind that fans out on one person and there are so many amazing musicians in the world.

Where can we find you online?

Everywhere, but you can use https://linktr.ee/dirtypaloma to follow me on social media, sign up for my quarterly newsletter, and see what I have going on.

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

Guerilla Opera has an artist networking event! It’s virtual and free, so anyone and everyone who has something to share is welcome to join us! And, of course, if you’re a composer of the Latin diaspora I hope you’ll submit to the Latinx Composer Miniature Challenge (LCMC 2.0).

New Year, New Connections: Virtual Happy Hour for Artists!

Wednesday, January 24, 2024, 7:00 PM ET

More Info: https://guerillaopera.org/eventcal/2023/12/29/new-year-new-connections-virtual-happy-hour-for-artists

Sign Up: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMldeCrqTovHdd9H_JUEmMXSzaTkK8zWClv 

photo by Tyler Hubby

photo by Tyler Hubby

Music I Am #45 – David Claman, Composer

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

It was a gradual process. When I was young I was involved with music as a player and listener, but intended to become a painter. I didn’t begin writing music until my late 20s. I took a composition class almost as a lark, and quickly realized that composing would bring together the creative energy I experienced making visual art with the intensity and enjoyment I felt while playing and listening to music.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Be supportive of your musician friends and their activities.

Two ways you stay motivated:

I like to “begin again” by doing basic things like tuning my guitar slowly and carefully by ear, with no goal other than hearing the timbres and consonances. Or playing scales, not as “warm up” but in order to feel my hands on the piano keys and experience the qualities of each note when the keys are depressed. 2) I’ll give myself a future goal, like scheduling a concert or booking a recording session.

Latest Project:

I completed a set of art songs for Matthew Curran, bass, accompanied by John McDonald, piano. We premiered them in December in New York and will perform them in Boston in 2024. Tony De Ritis is part of this project too, contributing songs he composed for tenor Greg Zavracky. After a few performances we plan to record an album together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

The fine musicians I’ve worked with for years, and the wonderful poetry I set by poets Richard Tillinghast, John Haines, and Robert Francis.

Who’s on it:

Matthew Curran, bass voice, and John McDonald, piano.

How do you discover new music?

I get suggestions from friends and find music on Youtube and Spotify.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Johannes Ockeghem (c. 1410-1497) is an extraordinary composer, known mostly to fans of early music and mentioned in music history classes. Fortunately, opportunities to hearing his music in concert are becoming more common.

Andrew Rangell is a wonderful pianist with a broad and varied catalog. His recording of the Bach Partitas on the Steinway label are refreshing, sensitive, and probing, and my favorite recordings of these pieces.

Where can we find you online?

I have a website and a YouTube channel, and Spotify 

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

In January and February 2024, I’ll be in India collaborating and recording with Hindustani musician friends in New Delhi. Recordings and videos of the sessions will be released in the summer of 2024.

Music I Am Interviews 2023 in Review

I started Music I Am Interviews in 2022, to learn more about artists I found exciting and to share their work with you. 

In 2023, 34 Artists were featured in the Music I Am Interviews! It has been an exhilarating year of listening to some truly wonderful musicians, learning about their introduction to music, composers we should know more about, and their latest projects.

To get out of my own bubble and discover new music, I made a point that a good majority of the interviews would be with those I have not collaborated with. 

Also we are on Instagram account! 
Follow us here: https://www.instagram.com/musiciaminterviews/

*Click on the names below to read their interview and see their latest projects!

11 Douglas Knehans Composer
12 Fred Hand Guitarist – Composer
13 Lori Laitman Composer
14 Alan Fletcher Composer – CEO
15 Armando Bayolo Composer
16 Dale Kavanagh Guitarist – Composer
17 Ann Moss Soprano
18 Ivan Enrique Rodriguez  Composer
19 David Starobin Guitarist Producer
20 Andree-Ann Deschenes Pianist
21 Richard Cameron-Wolfe Composer
22 Jessica Bowers Soprano 
23 Miguel del Aguila Composer
24 Buzz Gravelle Fretless Guitar
25 Daniel Kurganov Violinist
26 Kirsten Volness Composer
27 Gerard Cousins Guitarist – Composer
28 Trevor Berens Pianist
29 Holly Mulcahy Violinist
30 Stephanie Ann Boyd Composer
31 Alejandro Rutty Composer – Bass
32 Nicolás Lell Benavides Composer
33 Thomas L. Read Composer – Violinist
34 Vivian Fang Liu Pianist- Composer
35 Sophia Agranovich Pianist
36 Vivienne Aerts Singer – Composer
37 David Bernard Conductor
38 Diana Tash Mezzo-Soprano
39 Lisa Neher Composer – Soprano
40 Shaun Drew Composer
41 Nathalie Bonin Violinist – Composer
42 Nagme Yarkin Performer – Composer
43 Douglas Boyce Composer
44 Woody Harris Guitarist – Composer

 

Music I Am #44 – Woody Harris, Composer, Guitarist, Music Editor

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

Not sure, no one individual or moment.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Sense skills: listening, observing, tasting, feeling.

Two ways you stay motivated:

Constantly examining the textural sonorities I produce, their color, form and relationship to previous and following tones.

Latest Project:

‘Coming To My Senses’ is my most recent album, however I am working on a new album.

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

If this question follows on the previous one, I would say the sound world of previous works inspires me to search for new ways to work with open forms and to search for an even more intense balance between open harmonies, melodic fragments, polyrhythms and colors – to follow my instincts. The results hopefully expand the vocabulary and syntax of the guitar and in retrospect build a bridge between modern classical composition and the traditional American genres of jazz and blues. This form of expression I refer to as ‘intimate jazz’.

Who’s on it:

Me – at the moment

How do you discover new music?

For many years (decades) I have frequented contemporary classical music concerts – which are generally sparsely visited and ‘traditional’ jazz clubs. Additionally I listen to music friends produce and recommend. Having said this I admit to generally not listening to much music other than the music I am presently working on – it is enough. I work best in isolation. Having studied classical guitar, composition and musicology, and having worked as the senior editor of scholarly chamber music and orchestral music at the German music publisher Bärenreiter for over 25 years, I have had the privilege of working with autographs and primary sources of Bach, Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Debussy and Ravel among others, and working with these sources has revealed to me the general insecurities EVERY composer has in finalizing and fixating sounds. This is humbling work and helps me to see music with other eyes, and has helped me in the search for expression and growth in my music.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

  • Dead: Composer Charles Ives, guitarist Wes Montgomery
  • Alive: Italian Vito Palumbo and George Benjamin

Where can we find you online?

Music I Am #43 – Douglas Boyce, composer

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

It is an interesting question because the start of my interest in music-per-se was quite epiphanous: watching a videotape of Stop Making Sense in my junior year of high school and feeling ‘what the hell was all that!’ at the end. But the shift of my primary interests (physics, mathematics, classics, and history) had a much slower unfolding, happening over several years, with numerous, analogous eureka moments: first hearing Coltrane (suggested by my first piano teacher, a Franciscan nun with three music degrees from Eastman), first hearing Crumb (at a concert in an art museum where I walked in late and saw a percussionist drumming on bass strings ), first hearing Ars Subtilor (at a concert featuring the astounding Enemble P.A.N.), the last two in my freshman year at Williams College. But the story of how the idea of music as a career/life-project is less about inspiration and more about necessity: the conversations around whether my undergrad honors project would be in Physics or Music, with my teachers, family, friends, and myself were quite… fraught.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

I’ll give two. Skill at long-term planning, as in organizing one’s life but also practical stuff of Gannt diagrams and how to REALLY use a spreadsheet. That stuff matters to a surprising degree. A deep knowledge and earnest interest in at least one other domain of human life and thought. In a moment wherein the support for the arts and indeed the foundations of the noösphere are collapsing, as musicians, we must effectively translate our praxis and our intentions, and be able to do so without oversimplifying them or relying on existing ideologies about music in the world of non-musicians. As thinkers like Gadamer and (Richard) Bernstein taught us, the conversation across domains of thought is essential but requires a great deal of work to engage in a truly engaged pluralism. And if we can’t pull that off, we’re in even bigger trouble than it looks like we are.

Two ways you stay motivated:

Coffee & Deadlines. They are, in actuality, serious points, but let me explain. I arrange things, whenever I can, such that my morning coffee is consumed as I am consuming. Yes, I need to get up early and hit the ground running, but I have found over time that when I do that not only do I stay productive, but the rest of the day feels good because whatever annoying administrative grind I need to deal with, I can think back out the day being productive, and encourage to start the next day the same way Deadlines matter not just because they are obligations (contractual or reputational) but because I am lucky (and have worked hard (as echoed below) to work with wonderful players and (more importantly) wonderful friends and partners in the strange voyages of modern music. And so, the deadline is an obligation in the way that finding the right birthday present for a friend is. You put in the time because it is the right thing to do and to be doing, even when pressed.

Latest Project:

The Bird is an Alphabet is an album of new settings of American poets (Jorie Graham, BJ Ward, Wallace Stevens, Melissa Range, and Marlanda Dekine). All the poems are interrogations of language, of the word, and its role in life, and in the creative life; the music draws upon art-song, medieval music, modernist chamber music, and the energy and freedom of hip-hop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

The album connects to many themes of my work; A Book of Songs (recorded by tenor Robert Baker (tenor) and Molly Orlando (piano)) links the European 19th-century art-song tradition inaugurated with the modernist aesthetic which replaced its rhetoric. Scriptorium written for Byrne:Kozar:Duo by Melissa Range (Lawrence University) puts forward an evocation of the medieval ars veterum practices, but more severe in its outcome the work sets for poems. Ars Poetica was written for counter)induction and the poet, Marlanda Dekine, and provides musical spaces for the spoken performance of her poetry of personal history, and cultural form. As mentioned above, all of these works are written _for_ the performers, and so they are inspired by the texts, but also by the beautiful musicianship of those who would be joining the fun after the pieces were ‘done.’

Who’s on it:

A Book of Songs: Robert Baker, tenor, Molly Orlando, piano Scriptorium: Byrne:Kozar:Duo Ars Poetica: counter)induction, Marlanda Dekine (poet)

How do you discover new music?

If you are very careful and devout in what you engage with on social media, the algorithm will reward you; also, even if you find and listen to regional radio shows online you will often find a coherent, cogent sense of what is going on in the community.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

  1. Guillaume de Machaut: yes, not unknown, but not truly given the detailed study by more people. As I say to my students, you will come away from engaging with his music thinking that we’ve been in decline since 1350.
  2. Elena Mendoza: Look up Nebelsplitter, and fasten your seatbelts.

Where can we find you online?

www.douglasboyce.net

SpotifyBandcamp

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

Ars Poetica performed by counter)induction and Marlanda Dekine at the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Saturday, January 13, 8:00 pm https://www.music.pitt.edu/events/season

pic 2: Marlanda Dekine, Caleb van der Swaag, and Dan Lippel

Music I Am #42 – Nağme Yarkın, performer & composer

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

I started playing the piano at the age of 3, and my life was spent in a musical family, from grandfather to me, surrounded by music and art. I don’t remember, but my mother was singing in a choir when she was expecting me, so I probably understood it then. I knew this when I was born, but I couldn’t remember, maybe it could have been in earlier times.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Mindfulness, communication skill and doing every single moment one hundred percent wholeheartedly. -Mindfulness is a skill that develops while living life, and this is reflected in our music. It brings with it the indescribable enthusiasm of being in the moment and being one with the music and being music. -Communication ability brings with it listening to each other on stage and real communication. -And giving yourself with all your self while doing music brings originality, connection and realism in music.

Two ways you stay motivated:

Feeling connected to self & source and peacefully being alone at home.

Latest Project:

Baturay Yarkın Trio featuring Nağme Yarkın – “Fiery Desert”. We released a maxi single consisting of 3 songs in October 2023. The entire album “Dream Again” will be released in soon. All the works in this album composed by my brother, jazz and tango pianist Baturay Yarkın. We founded this group, including the jazz trio and me, in 2016. We play our own compositions, we blend traditional and folk music from Turkiye with jazz music, and we also have jazz standards in our repertoire. Playing this music with my instrument, the Istanbul kemence, attracts great attention in all the festivals and concerts we have attended so far. We have performed this project, in which we perform Anatolian music and jazz music without spoiling their essence and their principles in many festivals in Europe and the USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 


What inspired it:

Combination of Eastern & Western cultures, originality and individuality. With this project, we would love to blend Eastern and Western music and explain that we can all live in harmony, without discrimination, as a bridge. As people who share our beautiful world, this planet, our dream is to live freely and in peace, despite all our differences and by expanding our colors with these differences. None of us have to look alike or be the same. How nice it is to see something new every day, how nice it is to hear something new every day. With this band, we have a chance to participate in environments where we can share our different cultures eachother, and this really nourishes our music.

Who’s on it:

My brother, Baturay Yarkin, with whom we grew up together in the same house and brought together our instruments based on different roots, is the owner of this project as a pianist, composer and arranger. I take part in kemence of Istanbul, vocal and composer. Yarkın Tuncer is on bass and Mert Can Bilgin is on drums. Ozan Sarıer does the mixing and mastering of our album. Our album is published by Netherlands-based AudioMaze.

How do you discover new music?

I’m curious about what my non-musician friends listen to, and they can give me updates on this subject. We also share music with my musician friends and my students. Also I listen to my favorite radio stations and it helps me to discover new music.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

Living : Erkan Oğur (Fretless Guitar & Guitar & Vocal & Bağlama performer).

Dead : Tanburi Cemil Bey (Kemenche of Istanbul & Tanbur & Cello performer & composer).

Where can we find you online?

Online platforms where I share the most are Spotify, YouTube and Instagram.
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/41goFHVHIkQ22wQrCYUUbr?si=-7qUGM0bQEaLZhu_LYHfyg Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/@NagmeYarkn/videos
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nagmeyarkin/

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

International Guitar Festival in Ankara / Turkiye – December 2023. Here we will perform with our duo, which we established together with Turkiye’s leading guitarist Erdem Sökmen. Our duo’s album “Duende” will be released on all digital platforms in December 8, 2023.

 

Music I Am #41 – Nathalie Bonin, violin

The moment when you knew you wanted to be a musician:

I think my heart and soul knew from a very young age that I was to be a musician but after a few detours including pre-med, I consciously made the decision to be a creative and a musician when I was 24.

An important skill for a career in music that does not have anything to do with an instrument or making music:

Business, management and marketing because unless you are lucky to have a team to do this for you, especially in the beginning, chances are you will be the one that also has to plan, promote and sell your music. Talent is only a part of an artist’s life and there are countless hats we have to wear.

Two ways you stay motivated:

I keep surrounding myself with positive, inspiring and devoted people with whom I can share the successes as well as the struggles and be inspired by their discipline and efforts. Having that friend and community support is crucial because, let’s face it, it is a tough industry. Having the confidence that I was given a talent and that I have a very clear purpose to create and perform music that speaks to the heart. When people tell me how they were moved by my music or that it resonated so much or even healed them, it reminds me of how special it is to speak the language of music that can transmit so many emotions to literally EVERYONE on the planet.

Latest Project:

My latest main release is Aspirations on the Audio Network label. This album was recorded at the famous Abbey Road Studio 2 as well as School Farm Studios with a 30-piece ensemble and myself as soloist with James Brett conducting. This is my first collaboration with Audio Network and it has been an absolute dream to work with this team!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What inspired it:

Aspirations is Inspired by my journey to LA, taking that leap of faith, and facing some of the toughest yet most inspiring challenges in my life including a near fatal accident in 2021. This album is born out of the love, the support, the story, and the courage to follow my dream.

Who’s on it:

I was lucky to have some of the best session players in the world to record my music. The String ensemble was contracted by Isobel Griffiths Ltd, conducted by James Brett and led by Clio Gould as concertmaster with featured artists: Paul Bateman on piano, Caroline Dale on Cello, Auriel Pawsey on harp and myself as solo violinist.

How do you discover new music?

I like to ask what my friends are listening, I look at what the music platforms suggest, I go to concerts and shows and just keep being curious about what is coming out and be open to discover new styles and artists.

One living and one dead musician that deserves more attention:

  1. Danaë Xanthe Vlasse, a half-French, half-Greek composer living in Los Angeles since 2005. Her music encompasses art song, chamber music, works for solo piano and choral pieces and is associated to 11 albums.
  2. Lili Boulanger, a prodigy composer and musician and the first woman to be awarded the Grand Prix de Rome for her composition. She unfortunaly passed away very young at 24.

Where can we find you online?

You can find me on pretty much all socials IG: @nathalieboninmusic
TikTok: @nathalieboninmusic
Facebook: @nathaliebonin.violin
X (Twitter): @NBonin
You can listen to my music on all major music platforms like Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon, Tidal, Deezer etc..

Upcoming Event you’d like to share?

I have a few exciting Private events performing at the Biltmore in December and looking to have more performances of my music in 2024… some exciting projects in the pipes but too early to share details.