Archive for the ‘Contemporary Music’ Category

Tufts University Recital – 4/26

On Friday April 26, I return to Tufts University for the third time this semester for a recital that will complete an Arts Residency.

The recital, Altered Worlds, is on Friday April 26 at 12pm.

In the beautiful Distler Hall at Tufts University, it is free to attend and will stream online at: https://as.tufts.edu/music/news-events/live-streaming

Except for a short arrangement by Somerville native Alan Hovhaness, that was recently published (read about it), the concert features all living composers, the Boston premiere of the Richard Cameron-Wolfe micro-opera Heretic, three new lullabies, the world premiere two new works written by Tufts students, and the world premiere of a piano piece by yours truly played by John McDonald.

PROGRAM

Info Link:https://as.tufts.edu/music/news-events/events/calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D172105413

Review and Photos from Heretic, a micro-opera

Concert Review: Cameron-Wolfe’s “Heretic” — As Played by Aaron Larget-Caplan

By Aaron Keebaugh

Guitarist Aaron Larget-Caplan managed to keep the micro-opera’s crazed figure sympathetic as he blurred the lines between reality and delusion.

Guitarist Aaron Larget-Caplan performing Richard Cameron-Wolfe’s micro-opera Heretic. Photo: Catherine Larget-Caplan

 

“The secret of life is learning to live with interesting questions,” Richard Cameron-Wolfe said during the post-performance talkback following the American premiere of his micro-opera Heretic at Salem State’s Callan Studio Theater last Friday. The performer and composer had made good on that claim in the compelling resonance of his composition.

In this one-person drama, the protagonist, accompanying himself on guitar, wrestles with bewildering, irresolvable issues that lead to disillusion and eventual madness. Guitarist Aaron Larget-Caplan managed to keep the crazed figure sympathetic as he blurred the lines between reality and delusion.

Given its challenging psychological extremes, the opera cruises through a wide range of emotions in its taut 15 minutes. Drawing on jagged musical textures as well as a disjointed monologue, the score is a journey toward a sharp and shattering gaze into the abyss. The guitarist is both hero and antihero — steeped in the craziness he is gallantly struggling to overcome, this is a journey into coming to terms with insanity.

Inspired by British writer Arthur Machen’s semi-autobiographical 1907 novel The Hill of Dreams, Heretic starts off by placing its central figure in an almost nonsensical predicament. Larget-Caplan plays a character lost in a mental fog. He ambled onto the stage, shifting his gaze about nervously. He then sat down and tore through a jarring phrase that fell somewhere between the soundscapes of Iannis Xenakis and Steve Reich. Vocal utterances entered the fray, and words were slowly formed — language which was interrupted by more waves of violent dissonance. Though it was composed with Cameron-Wolfe’s usual mathematical precision, the music in Heretic can sound personal and harrowing. The piece places listeners into Machen’s dark, dreamy world, where the overwrought senses are finding it harder and hard to discern what is true.

But, while this was an unapologetic descent into mental oblivion, Larget-Caplan’s character is no Parsifalian fool. The man has his semi-lucid moments, articulating a cultural critique in which he blamed himself and others for creating a civilization that has no love for beauty and purity. Our ideals of art, he reasoned, were no longer goals for the imagination to reach — they were artifacts of what we have lost. As he made these scathing observations, the guitarist unleashed another barrage of sound — like an atonal heavy metal riff — that framed his points with an ironic levity.

Here was a man who was driving himself to the end of his tether. Larget-Caplan’s nervous and angular movements suggested the angst of a mind that couldn’t stop churning, couldn’t stop torturing itself. At one point, the guitarist angrily bolted to the rear curtain as if to abandon his mission to think, only to be sucked back in. Heretic ends in a spirit of disquiet — with mumbled words accompanied by the sound of a guitar purposely falling out of tune. The man’s dilemma is inescapable. Caught up in a vicious cycle of grand accusations and self-absorption, he boldly embraces his disheveled mental state, all pain and no illumination.

These manic swings were well-served by Friday’s minimalist staging. Chairs were arranged in cross patterns — as much a symbol of confusion as a pragmatic choice for Larget-Caplan’s performance. Michael Harvey’s lighting and video projections conveyed an eerie aura; Jerry L. Johnson’s swift and economical stage directions never let the solipsistic action lag. The wild thorns of Cameron-Wolf’s score were well served by Larget-Caplan, whose bold and energetic presence underscored his talents as a musician and actor.

The other pieces on his hour-long program were also dedicated to introspection. Keigo Fujii’s The Legend of Hagoromo relayed a Japanese legend with cinematic flair. It is a narrative of a woman who is whisked away to heaven, where she mourns the absence of her husband and son. Her tears water a flower on earth that grows toward paradise. Father and son climb up it to visit her. Fujii’s music colorfully conveys the sadness and joys of this metaphoric meditation on death, loss, and hoped-for reunion. Larget-Caplan played the piece like the fanciful love letter it is: warm and reflective, yet coursing with frequent flamenco-like verve.

John Cage’s In a Landscape embraces greater ambiance. Larget-Caplan’s arrangement of the piano original — inspired by Erik Satie — makes use of Campanella-style playing. Harmonics are meant to ring over the regularly fingered melodic line. The difficulty in executing such complicated effects are considerable, and the guitarist’s arrangement didn’t fit snugly under the fingers. The upshot is that at times Larget-Caplan’s performance felt labored and mechanical, lacking the resonance, the distant glow, that marks the original conception.

Larget-Caplan’s arrangement of Bach’s Prelude in C Major and Vineet Shende’s Carnatic Prelude No. 1 proved more successful. His generous rubato in the Bach allowed him to revel in every shift in harmony. In the Shende — a view of Bach by way of Indian classical music — he unspooled melodies and rhythmic flourishes over drone-like resonances. It was a splendid exercise in singing tone and alert sensitivity.

When taking his bows, Larget-Caplan gestured to his guitar, happy to share the limelight with an instrument that had done its job well. Still, modesty aside, the strengths of these performances came down to Larget-Caplan, a musician of fluent technique and dramatic verve.


Aaron Keebaugh has been a classical music critic in Boston since 2012. His work has been featured in the Musical TimesCorymbus, Boston Classical ReviewEarly Music America, and BBC Radio 3. A musicologist, he teaches at North Shore Community College in both Danvers and Lynn.

Heretic – a micro-opera at Salem State

Guitarist and composer Aaron Larget-Caplan returns to Salem State University for a special one-night-only concert. TICKETS & INFO

The concert, Altered Worlds, begins with Larget-Caplan’s arrangement of J.S. Bach’s Prelude in C Major, WTC I, BWV 846 partnered with Vineet Shende’s (Bowdoin College) Carnatic Prelude N. 1, After J.S. Bach, a re-imagining of the prior as if Bach were from South India. The monumental Legend of Hagoromo by Keigo Fujii explores mystical transformation through the 13th century myth, followed by John Cage’s serene In A Landscape, arranged by Larget-Caplan.

The evening concludes with the theatrical performance and US premiere of Heretic, a micro-opera for guitarist by Richard Cameron-Wolfe. Inspired by Arthur Machen’s haunting 1907 novel The Hill of Dreams, this realization is a multi-media event in collaboration with Salem State University theatre faculty Jerry Johnson and Aaron Larget-Caplan.

“As an artist, I try to push myself into new areas,” said Larget-Caplan, “and Heretic does that very well! Not just because I must sing, act, speak, and play a technically extremely difficult piece, but that each element is to be approached from the theatrical side as well. Collaborating with the theater director Jerry Johnson has enlivened the experience. I’m extremely excited!”

Born Arthur Llewelyn Jones in 1863, Arthur Machen became one of the most influential writers of his generation. He drew on the dark landscapes of his childhood in Wales, together with his adult life in bohemian fin-de-siécle London, to create magical and disturbing tales. His admirers include Stephen King, and H. P. Lovecraft, who described him as one of the four ‘modern masters of the horror story’.

Larget-Caplan will perform Heretic in April 2024 at Symphony Space in New York, Bowdoin College in Maine, and Tufts University in Medford.

Altered Worlds promises to be a new and wonderful adventures for music and theatre lovers!

Richard Cameron-Wolfe, Composer

 
Profile photo of J. L. Johnson

Jerry Johnson, Director

PROGRAM
Prelude N. 1 in C Major, BWV 846* – J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
Carnatic Prelude N. 1, After J.S. Bach* (2017) – Vineet Shende (b.1972)
The Legend of Hagoromo (1992) – Keigo Fujii (b.1956)
In A Landscape* (1948) – John Cage (1912-1992)
Heretic (2022) – Richard Cameron-Wolfe (b.1943)

*Written for or arranged by Aaron Larget-Caplan

 

LISTING:
Friday January 26 • 7:30pm
Salem State University in conjunction with the Music and Theater departments presents Aaron Larget-Caplan in Altered World, a solo program exploring transformation.
Composers: 
J.S. Bach, Vineet Shende, Keigo Fujii, John Cage, and the US premiere of Heretic – a micro opera by Richard Cameron-Wolfe – directed by Jerry Johnson (SSU Theater Faculty).
Information and Tickets: HERE ($10-15)
Location: 
Callan Studio Theatre, Salem State University, 352 Lafayette Street, Salem, MA 01970 (MAP)
Program Notes for the concert: https://alcguitar.com/blog/heretic-at-salem-state/

PROGRAM NOTES

Prelude No. 1 in C Major, WTC Book 1, BWV 846* by J.S. Bach

The first prelude in The Well-Tempered Clavier comprises a simple arpeggio figure; the dramatic tension only builds through harmonic change. While a moment in time, the arpeggio feels eternal. Gounod based his ‘Ave Maria’ on this prelude. I raise the octave of the last measures for an ethereal conclusion. Recorded on Aaron’s 2022 album ‘God’s Time: Music of J.S. Bach on Guitar (Tiger Turn) SPOTIFY

Carnatic Prelude N. 1, After J.S, Bach* (2017) by Vineet Shende

Vineet Shende and Aaron

A measure for measure re-imagination of Bach’s Prelude N. 1 in C-Major, WTC I, BWV 846 as if Bach were from South India. A fusion of the Eastern melodic and rhythmic traditions of Carnatic music (raga – scale, taal – rhythmic cycle) and Western harmonic traditions.

Carnatic music does not use harmony as the western tradition, so Shende uses rhythmic flourishes to denote a cadence or phrase ending. The project will continue for a total of 12 Carnatic Preludes by Shende being paired with Larget-Caplan’s arrangements of the original Bach keyboard works for guitar.

The legend of Hagoromo (1992) by Keigo Fujii

Found in variation throughout Asia, the Hagoromo legend describes a young fisherman falling in love with a heavenly maiden who can fly when she wears her magical feathered kimono (Hagoromo). Wanting to prevent her from leaving him, he steals and hides her Hagoromo while she bathes under the autumn full moon. After a time, and unable to go home to the immortal world, she returns his love and they have a child together. While walking her young son, the boy sings a lullaby whose words describe where the Hagoromo is hidden. Donning it and robed in the blue of heaven she ascends again! But she cries in sadness, for she cannot bring her husband and son along. Lovesick and lonely as well, her husband plants the seed of a moonflower for her, and as her tears water it from the world above it grows into the heavens allowing the fisherman to climb up and join her; her tears becoming a rainbow. B

ased on a 16-bar song in the traditional Okinawan mode by Hiroshi Yamanoha (d.1991) about the Hagoromo legend, Keigo Fujii does not adhere strictly to the mode and incorporates many extended techniques and effects to create one of the 20th century’s great masterpieces. Recorded on Aaron’s 2013 album ‘The Legend of Hagoromo’ (Stone Records). SPOTIFY

In A Landscape* (1948) by John Cage, Arr. A. Larget-Caplan

Through composed, the composition can be divided into three parts by the repetition of the opening melodic figure and arpeggio. Choreographer Louise Lippold conceived of the 15 x 15 measures (5-7-3) rhythmic structure.

The work travels the length of the guitar and requires extensive use of campanella, natural and artificial harmonics, tambura, and peaceful control. The arrangement required multiple register adjustments, but no note changes. The most daunting of my Cage arrangements due to extended fixed gamut of tones and the use of two voices that need to resonate throughout, it is also the most lyrical of the mid-period works where one can hear the lines so reminiscent of Satie. I met Cage in Dream, but I fell in love with Cage through In A Landscape. Recorded on Aaron’s 2018 album ‘John. Cage. Guitar.’ (Stone Records) SPOTIFY

Heretic* (1994/2017/2022) by Richard Cameron-Wolfe

This Heretic speaks the unspeakable, thinks the unthinkable, and plays the unplayable. At the outset, Orthodoxy tries to stop him from speaking his first word.

At last, the Heretic addresses us, with “I want to tell you what’s going on here”, but immediately has second thoughts: “You don’t want to know.” He then moves uncomfortably close to the audience and, in a Mephistophelian tone, asks for our “trust”. Then, calmly and conversationally, he refers to Arthur Machen’s book The Hill of Dreams – its contents perhaps holding a key to the nature of the Heretic’s mental state (unreality/alienation). After a robotic, manic, minimalist rant, the Heretic abruptly begins to leave, pauses, and reluctantly returns, apparently to become simply a guitarist.

An extended, abstract, contrapuntal passage follows, punctuated however with comments from the Heretic – alternately introspective and communicative, about beauty, perfection, and art. But the Heretic is, as we suspected, quite mad, regretting this encounter. He pushes us away, turning inward – and we are released, liberated. This performance is the U.S. Premiere.

Heretic will be performed at Bowdoin College (April 6) Symphony Space in NYC (April 20), and Tufts University (April 26).

Larget-Caplan’s arrangements of John Cage’s piano music published by Edition Peters

2024 Concert Preview!

Upcoming Concerts!

  • Friday Jan. 19 – cellist Rafael Popper-Keizer guest artist on the recital series Now Musique, Directed by Aaron Larget-Caplan. INFO

Aaron Larget-Caplan Performs:

  • Friday Jan. 26 – Salem State University, Altered Worlds – recital and US premiere of Heretic, a micro-opera by Richard Cameron-Wolfe for solo guitarist. INFO
  • Feb. 29 – Oklahoma City University, Oklahoma, Concert+Class. INFO
  • March 1 – Spanish Gems – New Album on Tiger Turn (Aaron’s 11th album!)
  • March 10 – Astoria, Oregon
  • March 19 – King’s Chapel, Boston
  • March 28 – Tufts University, Mass, Late-Night Concert featuring the New Lullaby Project
  • April 6 – Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, Residency+Concert – Heretic
  • April 7 – Camden, Maine
  • April 20 – Symphony Space, New York INFO – Heretic
  • April 26 – Tufts University Residency+Concert – Heretic
  • May 4-5 – Bowdoin College, Choir+Guitar, Pravasa – Travels of the Guitar by Vineet Shende

Complete Concert Information: ALCGuitar.com/calendar
*more concerts are being added

2023 Year in Review – Adventure in Music

I am grateful for the many people who have made this year so special. At times I felt like 2023 was a normal year of music making and collaboration, and then I would be reminded that our recent past is very much with us and that the world is very fragile. 

I consider 2023 to be Adventure in Music year, and I think we have earned a bit of rest and a special cappuccino or affogato (see below) to commemorate the beauty that can exist in the world, if we so desire it.

Onward for a wonderful, safe, and healthy 2024, and thanks to all who have listened, enjoyed, and explored music with me in 2023!

Aaron

Collaborators:

  • Christopher Bush, clarinet
  • Johnathan McCullough, baritone
  • Frederic Jodry III, harpsichord
  • Robert Lehman, violin
  • Kimberly Lehman, viola
  • Rebecca Hartka, cello
  • Jeff Christmas, conductor with the Bowdoin Chamber Choir
  • Charles Coe, poet
  • Kabir Sehgal, Tiger Turn
  • Alex Fedorov, design
  • Steve Hunt, mixing and mastering
  • Gina Genova, Will Rowe, and Simon Henry Berry, American Composers Alliance
  • Gene Caprioglio, Edition Peters
  • Steve Schwartz, Your Heaven Audio
  • Michael Newman, Mannes School of Music
  • João Luiz, Hunter College
  • Tali Roth, Juilliard
  • Nick Morgan, TEDx

Premieres:

  • Alan Hovhaness – Mystic Flute, Op. 29arranged by ALC, Robbins Library, Arlington, MA, February 2023 (US premiere)
  • Daniel Felsenfeld – Only Winter Certainties on Bargemusic, Brooklyn, New York, April 2023 (info)
  • Sam Cave – …in the soft dark welling… at the Smith Center for the Arts, Providence College, September 2023
  • Nicolás Lell Benavides – Rinconcito for guitar & string trio, University of Southern Maine, December 2023 (info)

New Album & Recordings

  • Spanish Candy – May 26, 2023 on Tiger Turn (888-10) (info)
  • Berceuse Inquiète by Ronald Pearl, for the New Lullaby Project, live at Providence College (listen)

Album Reviews

Publications:

  • honey cadence – a collection of six meditations by Aaron Larget-Caplan was published by the American Composers Alliance, May 2023 (info)

Publication Review:

Awards: 

  • Paul Revere Award for Graphic Excellence from The Music Publishers Association of the United States presented for Aaron’s arrangement of Bacchanale by John Cage, June 2023 (info)
  • Cultural Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council for Now Musique, Feb. 2023
  • Best of 2023 by The Arts Fuse: God’s Time: Music of J.S. Bach on Guitar, Dec. 2023 (info)
  • Reached 6-million streams!

Videos:

  • Spanish Candy intro video (watch)
  • Remembering by Laurie Spiegel, written for the New Lullaby Project (watch)
  • Libertango by Astor Piazzolla, arranged for sextet (watch)
  • Interview with Anthony R. Green (watch
  • Interview with Daniel Felsenfeld (watch)
  • TEDx – moving still by Aaron Larget-Caplan (watch

Instructional Videos:

Interviews:

Classes

Misc.

  • New press photos with photographer Paula Morin (info)
  • TEDx – moving still by Aaron Larget-Caplan (watch

New York Concerts and Classes

Last week, I performed on Bargemusic and gave masterclasses at Hunter College and Juilliard Preparatory Division. It was a wonderful few days meeting friends, sharing music, and exploring the city.
 
It was my second solo program on the iconic Bargemusic, at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, and like the first time last April, it was a glorious experience! Multiple premieres and some of my favorite pieces!
Thank you Mark Peskanov and Theresa for having me back.
 
NOTABLES:
  • ‘Tracing a wheel on water’ by Kevin Siegfried was written for me 20 years ago. This was the 2nd New York performance!
  • For 13 years New Lullabies written for my New Lullaby Project have been featured in 90% of my concerts. Tonight were two by Dennis Bathory-Kitsz and Stephanie Ann Boyd.
  • My own ‘slight nuance’ received its NY premiere. 3-million streams to date!
  • My arrangement of ‘Mystic Flute’ by Alan Hovhaness will be published later this year by Edition Peters Group.
  • The River Café makes a super smooth drink. Wear a jacket and visit.
I was the guest of João Luiz and Sarah Overholt for a masterclass with their students of Hunter College. A program of Brouwer, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, and Sor, the students Gabby, Kevin, Enrique and Vítor did a wonderful job!
Thank you to Mark Spicer, João, and Sarah for having me! On October 7th, I had the pleasure of working with the students of Tali Roth at the Juilliard School. The young students played Marco Pereira and Agustín Barrios, and did a wonderful job!
 

 
 
 

Bargemusic NYC Return on Oct. 6

Photo L-R: Kevin Siegfried, Alan Hovhaness, Stephanie Ann Boyd, Dennis Báthory-Kitsz, Aaron Larget-Caplan,
and Keigo Fujii

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Guitar Virtuoso Aaron Larget-Caplan to Mesmerize Audiences Once Again at Bargemusic’s ‘Eclectic Series’ Performance

Photo by Tracey Yarad, April 2023

LINK FOR TICKETS HERE

BROOKLYN, NY — August 15, 2023 — Bargemusic, New York’s premier floating concert hall, is thrilled to announce the highly-anticipated return of guitarist and composer Aaron Larget-Caplan to its stage. On Friday, October 6, 2023, at 7:00 pm, Bargemusic will be transformed into a musical haven as Larget-Caplan presents his extraordinary solo program, “Dances, Dreams, and Legends.”  

Larget-Caplan promises an enchanting evening of musical diversity, showcasing a fusion of cultures, emotions, and legends through the language of the guitar. The program, “Dances, Dreams, and Legends,” will feature an eclectic repertoire that includes dances from Brazil, Spain, and the United States, contemporary lullabies composed specifically for Larget-Caplan’s groundbreaking New Lullaby Project, and a monumental solo piece inspired by the captivating 13th-century Japanese legend of Hagoromo.

Lovers of classical and contemporary guitar music will be treated to compositions by Isaac Albéniz, J.S. Bach, Antonio Jobim, and Keigo Fujii. Additionally, the evening features the New York premieres of compositions by Alan Hovhaness, Stephanie Anne Boyd, Dennis Báthory-Kitsz, Kevin Siegfried, and Larget-Caplan.

Join us for an unforgettable evening of musical artistry as Aaron Larget-Caplan returns to Bargemusic to weave a captivating tapestry of melodies, rhythms, and legends through his guitar.

Larget-Caplan will be giving classes at Hunter College (10/4) and Juilliard Pre-College (10/6). More are being added. 

*****

Photo by Tracey Yarad, April 2023

Event Details:
Date and Time: Friday, October 6, 2023, at 7:00 pm
Admission: $35

Venue:
Bargemusic
Fulton Ferry Landing
Brooklyn Bridge Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11201

For ticket information and reservations, please visit: https://www.bargemusic.org/concert/eclectic-series-dances-dreams-and-legends-antonio-jobim-kevin-seigfried-dennis-bathory-kitsz-stephanie-ann-boyd-isaac-albeniz-aaron-larget-caplan-alan-hovhaness-j-s-bach-keigo-fujii-aar/ 

FB Event: HERE

About Aaron Larget-Caplan:

Aaron Larget-Caplan is an internationally acclaimed guitarist and composer known for his virtuosity and passion for expanding the boundaries of classical guitar music. His ten albums have earned over 5-million streams since 2021, and he has received numerous awards and accolades for his groundbreaking projects and performances, making him a prominent figure in the contemporary and classical music scene.

About Bargemusic:

Bargemusic, moored at the scenic Fulton Ferry Landing under the iconic Brooklyn Bridge, is a unique floating concert venue offering exceptional performances and breathtaking views of the Manhattan skyline. Renowned for its commitment to bringing world-class music to the heart of New York City.

Photo by Tracey Yarad, April 2023

Bargemusic Program & Photos

Bargemusic Eclectic Series:
“Look Bach, Listening Forward”/ Aaron Larget-Caplan
April 15, 2023

Look Bach, Listening Forward
Aaron Larget-Caplan, guitar

PROGRAM

sweet nuance (2022)                                                                        Aaron Larget-Caplan (b. 1978)

Prelude in C Major, BWV 846*                                                                   J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Carnatic Prelude N. 1, After J.S. Bach* (2017)                                        Vineet Shende (b. 1972)

Two New Lullaby Project Solos

  1. Remembering* (2021)                                                                   Laurie Spiegel (b. 1945)
  2. Counting Backwards* (2020)                                                  Anthony R. Green (b. 1984)

moving still (2021)                                                                                                    Larget-Caplan

Chromatic Fantasy in D Minor, BWV 903*                                                                             Bach

In A Landscape* (1948)                                                                              John Cage (1912-1982)

Only Winter Certainties (2023)         World Premiere                         Daniel Felsenfeld (b. 1970)

  1. America Gone Plastic
  2. Night Becomes Everything
  3. Just a Song at Twilight
  4. Hours Pass, Darkness Comes
  5. It Wasn’t Me

Mantilla de Feria                                                                         Esteban de Sanlúcar (1910-1989)

Sevilla*                                                                                                   Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909)

*Written for or arranged by Aaron Larget-Caplan
**All NYC Premieres except Sanlúcar

PR, Videos and Interview: https://alcguitar.com/bargemusic415/

BARGEMUSIC Info

Photos from the Bargemusic Concert with composers and friends

Premiere of Felsenfeld’s ‘Only Winter Certainties’

On April 15, I have the great honor and pleasure of giving the world premiere of Daniel Felsenfeld’s first guitar solo ‘Only Winter Certainties‘ on Bargemusic in Brooklyn, New York.
 
Danny was a doctoral student at the New England Conservatory when I was an undergraduate, so our paths did not meet directly, but it was impossible not to hear his music. Your life will be better hearing his music.
 
‘Only Winter Certainties is a 12min work subtitled ‘5 Preludes for guitar,’ with each movement’s individual title coming from an author or musician. Standard tuning and no extended techniques, Danny pushes the performer technically to realize a kaleidoscope of emotions while maintaining an anxious intensity and deep clarity.
 
Danny and I sat down last week and talked about this endeavor.  A voracious reader, Danny talks about composing, why it took so long to write for guitar, and so much more. Yes, his puppy joined us.  
 
Take a listen:
 

 

Upcoming Concerts

4/15 – Bargemusic concert info: HERE
5/7 – Art Complex Museum, Duxbury, MA: HERE
5/19 – The Music Mansion, Providence: HERE
5/20 – Now Musique at the Arlington Street Church, Boston: 

Grant Award – Now Musique

On February 15, Now Musique received a Cultural Recovery Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council awarded.

Founded by Aaron Larget-Caplan in 2019, Now Musique is dedicated to exploring the new and neglected in music with solo and chamber music concerts being presented in Boston and beyond. 

Between August and November 2022, Now Musique presented 5 program in 8 concerts in the Boston neighborhood of Dorchester. The programs featured 25 composers with many in attendance, as well as a few dead composers for balance. 

We are honored and grateful to have received the award and we look forward to celebrating through music in the near future!

http://nowmusique.com/ 

Our next concert is May 19 in Providence, Rhode Island with Grammy Nominated baritone Johnathan McCullough.

Now Musique is fiscally sponsored by Fractured Atlas. All donations are tax deductible.

Mass Cultural Council Celebrates $51M in Cultural Sector Pandemic Recovery Grants

 

Funding List